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WHAT TIME IS IT? CONVENTION TIME!
We’re at the Amazing Las Vegas Comic-Con this weekend and it’s awesome. This is the first time I’ve cosplayed and I had a blast.

WHAT TIME IS IT? CONVENTION TIME!

We’re at the Amazing Las Vegas Comic-Con this weekend and it’s awesome. This is the first time I’ve cosplayed and I had a blast.

Jun 7
so my friend graduated and wrote this in the announcement he gave my husband and me.

so my friend graduated and wrote this in the announcement he gave my husband and me.

A Brief Study of the Magical Socio-political Structures of Harry Potter

Before we begin I’m going to talk for a few paragraphs about some housekeeping stuff, because it occurs to me that while you probably know at least the basics of the world of Harry Potter, you might not be aware of the ridiculous nuances of comparative politics and intergovernmental relations.


The term that might be most confusing to Americans is “state” because our version is slightly warped. In terms of world politics, a “state” refers to a sovereign population and government within a set physical boundary, in the modern era usually one that’s been granted legal recognized status in the U.N. For example, United Kingdom is a state. England is not. England can be called a “nation” in that its people generally share an ethnicity, language, and history. “Country” is the most broad term of the three, usually meaning the physical land itself. This is all confusing and I apologize.

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Fictional Governments: A Song of Ice and Fire Part 2 Daenerys Targaryen and Colonialism

It certainly took a while for me to finish this, and I went in a vastly different direction than I thought I would. I began to catalogue and describe the various governments on Essos, the second continent in the world of A Song of Ice and Fire (there are two more, but as yet they are wholly unimportant to the narrative) but I ran into problems; namely there are too many, they are not described in enough detail, or they are too similar to one another. So I’m going to focus on Daenerys Targaryen and the development of her role as a non-state actor (and indeed, not much of an actor at all until the death of her brother) to a major military power with the fictional equivalent of nuclear hegemony, with particular concentration on her narrative as a colonial power.

(Please be aware that spoilers follow for events up to and including A Dance With Dragons.)

 

 

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Feb 9

Fictional Political Systems: A Song of Ice and Fire / A Game of Thrones part 1: Westeros

Power resides where men believe it resides.
- A Clash of Kings, George R.R. Martin

This is a pretty simple truth about the nature of the governance of humans, known in real politics as consent of the governed.  It’s pretty much the essence of government; we choose who governs us in one way or another, whether we vote with ballots or by stabbing people. You can talk all you want about mandates from God (or The Seven, or Rh’lorr) but at the end of the day one single person can’t do a whole lot unless other people care to listen to them.

The line comes from a conversation between two characters who don’t trust each other. Varys posits this riddle to Tyrion Lannister; a king, a septon (priest) and a rich man are in a room with a mercenary and each wants the mercenary to kill the other two. To whom does the mercenary listen?

In ASOIAF, this theme comes up time and time again. There’s several political systems in several cultures that are explicitly identified and I don’t want to build too big of a Wall of text (haha, I made a joke) so I’ll concentrate on the most explained system and go into the others in subsequent installments.

I’ll be working from knowledge of events up to A Dance With Dragons, the last book released thus far, so there may be spoilers. If you’re unfamiliar with this universe, you’re about to be, but since even people who’ve read the books need to look up characters and countries sometimes, I suggest A Wiki of Ice and Fire, which I’ll also be using because nobody’s memory is that perfect. If your knowledge comes from the t.v. show, that’s a good start, but bear in mind that there’s about 200 more characters and reams of backstory in just the two books that have been adapted thus far.

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Feb 7
Video Game Hair Bows and Bowties by Crashedhope Designs
Available here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/crashedhope

Video Game Hair Bows and Bowties by Crashedhope Designs

Available here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/crashedhope

Feb 7

Do you think they are going to make a Marvel "Civil War" movie following the Avengers?

Honestly, I don’t think so. There’s been a pretty concerted effort on the MCU’s part to avoid directly following any sort of event predicated by the comics.

As much as I liked the Civil War arc, I think there were more people who didn’t and for very distinct and logical reasons; it was too long and unwieldy, the real-life political parallels were ham-fisted, characterization fluctuated wildly, it was pushed along plot-wise by the unfettered stubbornness of Tony Stark and Steve Rogers and like, nobody else, and it ends with Steve “dying” which would require another movie to fix.

I really like the idea behind Civil War: that being a normal human in this universe is a potentially terrifying thing and we’d logically try to legislate that a bit. Maybe that idea will make it into the MCU in some form, but I don’t see it as it’s own film.

Feb 5

At what point do we just start calling 3-D printers replicators though?

Feb 5
comicsalliance:

‘Parks & Rec’ Star Chris Pratt is Your Star-Lord in ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ MovieBy Andy Khouri
Marvel Studios has cast actor Chris Pratt in the lead role of Star-Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy, the film that’s to launch the next phase of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe following the success of The Avengers. Best known as the kind hearted but dangerously inept Andy Dwyer on the NBC sitcom Parks & Recreation and for roles in Zero Dark Thirty and Moneyball, Pratt is an unexpected but very intriguing choice for a space-faring superhero.Read more. 

today in nobody saw this coming

comicsalliance:

‘Parks & Rec’ Star Chris Pratt is Your Star-Lord in ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Movie

By Andy Khouri

Marvel Studios has cast actor Chris Pratt in the lead role of Star-Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy, the film that’s to launch the next phase of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe following the success of The Avengers. Best known as the kind hearted but dangerously inept Andy Dwyer on the NBC sitcom Parks & Recreation and for roles in Zero Dark Thirty and Moneyball, Pratt is an unexpected but very intriguing choice for a space-faring superhero.

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today in nobody saw this coming

Feb 5

I’ve been looking for something to talk about at boring, verbose length, especially since I’ll be using this blog as an assignment for a Social Media class and I guess it’s nice to post about stuff every so often.

I’ve settled on combining my two strengths: comparative politics and fictional universes. So for the foreseeable future, or at least however long it holds my interest, I plan on identifying and critiquing this aspect of world-building, comparing them to the political systems that exist or have existed in the real world. 

If you have any suggestions on fictional governments you’d like me to look into and type about, please let me know. Otherwise, here’s a few of the top of my head I plan on definitely posting:

  • The Lord of the Rings
  • A Song of Ice and Fire/Game of Thrones
  • Harry Potter

The first two will provide a few posts in and of themselves due to the varied nature of their universes; they realistically have several different systems within their purview. 

As usual, thanks for following as I continue to use my Political Science degree in new and increasingly useless ways.